Sunday, January 18, 2015

Next Meeting: February 10th

TPTBC's next meeting will be held on Feb. 10th at 6pm.  It will take place at Becky's Coffee Corner/Becky's Video in Prosser.  Please note that our meetings take place on the second Tuesday of each month.  Meetings typically go from 6pm until 7:30pm.


The discussion of the evening will be centered around the novel, Killing Patton by Bill O' Reilly and Martin Dugard.  Ms. Nona Gall will be our host.  Please join us for an enlightening and respectful discussion while gaining insight of each other's perspectives about the book.







Bill O'Reilly is the anchor of The O'Reilly Factor, the highest-rated cable news show in the country. He also writes a syndicated newspaper column and is the author of several number-one bestselling books, including Killing Jesus, Killing Kennedy, and Killing Lincoln.
Martin Dugard is the New York Times bestselling author of several books of history. His book Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone has been adapted into a History Channel special. He lives in Southern California with his wife and three sons. (taken from; http://www.amazon.com/Killing-Patton-Strange-Audacious-General/dp/product-description/080509668X/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books)






Currently (and unfortunately), the coffee shop service hours are open until 5pm.  There are bottled beverages available for purchase and water will be provided.  Becky's Video is open until 8pm on Tuesdays.

Monday, January 5, 2015


TPTBC would like to announce that their next meeting is scheduled for the 2nd Tuesday of the month, January 13th.  The meeting will take place at Becky’s Coffee Corner in Prosser, at 6pm.  Zita Massie will be our host for the evening.

The evening will include conversations about the book;

Very Valentine by Adriana Trigiani



A Note from Adriana Trigiani
The story of this novel began with a lady on a roof. Every morning, I head over to the Hudson River Park for fresh air and a run (just found out the exhaust fumes of the West Side Highway could kill me more quickly than lack of exercise, go figure), and I became obsessed with a woman living on one of the last small buildings facing the river amidst the “progress” of glamorous high-rises and hotels. I’d wonder, “Why does she stay?” Most summer mornings she was in her housecoat tending to tomato plants that line the fence of her rooftop. I never waved or rang her bell, but I connected to her. She reminded me of my grandmothers, who had their own gardens, and for most of their widowed lives, lived alone. I began to look for the woman, and when I saw her, I felt relieved, as though life wasn’t really racing by, and that the past was somehow, in the form of this lady, still alive. This lady, whose name I do not know and whom I have never met, brought me to the story of Carlo Bonicelli, my grandfather, a shoemaker. I keep a photograph of him on my desk to remind me of the artisans that came before me. (It’s a crowded desktop; those of you who read Lucia, Lucia know about the seamstresses in my family!) My grandfather Carlo died when he was thirty-nine years old. My grandmother told me that while he repaired shoes and built them, his dream was to design them. He did not live long enough to see his dream materialize. With my grandmother gone, I asked my mother about him, about his work. This wasn’t easy, as my mom cries whenever she talks about her father. As those of you dutiful children out there know, when our mothers cry, it’s like somebody’s plunging a knife into our chests. But this time, I asked her not to cry, and she told me the story of the Bonicelli shoes. Then I went to Italy with my dear pal Gina Casella, (with our five-year-old daughters in tow) to learn how to make shoes. I met a few of the great artisans, who became the inspiration for the shoemakers in this novel. The trip changed my creative life, but it also changed the substance and course of this story. I come from people who survived by the labor of their own hands in a glorious country of their choice (our United States). I always knew this, but now I understand it. I only live as an artist because they gave me their stories, and because you read them. So, Dear Reader (love it--so Jane Austen!), Very Valentine is for you. It’s about all of us: our family dynamics, our dreams, our luck or lack of it in matters of the heart, and how we negotiate going forward, in a world that’s moving so fast, even a stroll is now a blur. This is the first of three books about Valentine Roncalli and her family of shoemakers. When I wrote it, I wanted to bring you old world craftsmanship, the magical setting of Greenwich Village, in a contemporary family saga told in vivid detail. I hope you enjoy it.--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. (taken from; http://www.amazon.com/Very-Valentine-Novel-Adriana-Trigiani/dp/0061257060)